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Greetings! My name is Matthew, and I love to listen to all types of metal. Since I’m a Christian, most of the bands that I listen to reflect my faith or have positive, uplifting lyrics. The other thing that you should know is that I love to write – in fact, I want to write epic science fiction for a living.

Thursday, January 16, 2014

ForChristSake - "Apocalyptic Visions of Divine Terror" Album Review


The clouds of the heavens roll back and the White Rider descends with eyes of blazing fire, come to rain judgment upon the Earth.  The hordes of evil cower under a fierce onslaught of rolling guitars and drums as relentless growling rents the air.  If the human mind can truly fathom the wanton destruction that comes with the end times, certainly ForChristSake has hit a chord of verisimilitude with their extreme metal debut Apocalyptic Visions of Divine Terror.
Apocalyptic Divisions of Divine Terror is a carefully crafted album that plunges into multiple metal subgenres.  The band draws influence from legendary acts like Bolt Thrower in its thrashy riffs and driving melodies, while the breakneck pace, drumming, and shouting that is interspersed with the death growls is reminiscent of Living Sacrifice’s album Inhabit.  Intermingled amidst this wealth of diversity are black metal shrieks, symphonic pieces, melodic riffs, and even some singing.  These elements all mesh together to create an enjoyable, diverse album for the listener.   A few highlights from the album include the driving thrash monster “At the Gates of Depravity,” the heroic, guitar-shredding “Serpent Rises,” and the groove-laden “Necronemesis.”
While these elements all blend together to create a highly enjoyable, intricate album, Apocalyptic Visions of Divine Terror is merely a stepping stone towards a higher pinnacle.  It’s a step in the right direction, but the band still has a few things to tweak.  The album is extensive in length, with 16 tracks.  For the average prog lover, this isn’t any problem.  For some thrash and death metal heads, this may be more of an issue.  ForChristSake keeps it captivating enough that you won’t lose interest easily, but it’s still a monolith of sound that takes a firm will to tackle all at once.  Cutting a few of the songs off of the top would have made the album more accessible to the casual listener.  While the production is excellent, there is still some work to do to create a perfect balance between the different musical elements that appear on the album.
If the band continues to experiment with different styles of music, and they grow more cohesive as a unit, they have immense potential.  Death, thrash, and black metal fans alike will find many aspects of Apocalyptic Visions of Divine Terror enjoyable.  So what are you waiting for?  Put on your headphones, tune out the world around you, and experience a new vision of terror and mayhem.

  Rating:  3.5/5.0

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